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Camp Wolverton - Felt Patches 1939-1953  
        jump to patches from  >  1940    1941-45    1946    1947    1948    1949-50    1951-52    1953    1950's Pack Trips    1954-72           14,495 Club     Wolverton Ski Bowl

        1939    
             Crescent Bay Council Scouts were summer camping within Sequoia National Park as early as 1927. However, the establishment of a permanent Crescent Bay camp location in the Wolverton area is generally attributed to 1939.
         Known in the beginning as HIGH SIERRA CAMP, the site utilized an existing building and outhouses but was mostly undeveloped and primarily served as a base camp to hike into the Sierra Nevada mountains.
        
A "Good Camper"  program, similar to that being used at Camp Emerald Bay was part of
     
    High Sierra Camp in 1929 and from the beginning when the new High Sierra Camp opened in Wolverton Meadow in 1939.
  Silk screened on black (or navy blue) felt.
Patch was available only to those Scouts who met GOOD CAMPER requirements.
   

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1940  

          Flocked on sateen with ribbons attached. Camp name spelled HIGH SIERRAS. Patch depicts a Sequoia cone. As in previous summers for Crescent Bay Council, patches were only awarded to Good Campers. For 1940, the camp staff created a special "Nature Award". The exact requirements for the Nature Award are not known other than colored ribbons, attached to the Good Camper patch, were used  to signify different levels called Standard, Excellent and Super.

          Camp Emerald Bay offered no camping in 1940 and HIGH SIERRAS/WOLVERTON Camp served as the only summer camp for Crescent Bay Council that year.

1940
Good Camper
  1940
Green Ribbon
Standard Level
  1940
Red Ribbon
Excellent Level
  1940
Blue Ribbon
Super Level



     
             


1941-45  
         
          HIGH SIERRA CAMP
, also referred to as WOLVERTON and SEQUOIA CAMP, had a robust camping summer program in 1941. With the outbreak of World War II followed by gas rationing & restrictions, and the popularity & proximity of Camp Josepho, Crescent Bay Council decided to close the camp in Sequoia National Park for 1942. Even though there was no staff or organized program at the camp between 1942-45, many Crescent Bay Scouts camped there none-the-less. Camps Wolverton & Josepho Ranger Paul Weiss Sr. spoke of driving individual troops, one at a time, to Wolverton in the back of the Council truck where he would return to get them after their camping session was over.

1941
Sequoia Camp
1942
Pack Trip

Early 1940's
Silk screened on felt.
Now referred to as SEQUOIA Camp.
With very limited summer camping at Emerald Bay in 1941, Sequoia Camp and the brand new Camp Josepho were the primary summer camps for Crescent Bay Council in 1941. Patch shows the famous
General Sherman tree, largest living
thing in the world.

 
Silk screened on felt. Between 1942-45, Crescent Bay Council shifted all summer camping to the "West Point of Scouting",
Camp Josepho. However, Sequoia Camp
was used as a launch point for another 10-day Pack Trip to the top of Mt. Whitney.
Pack burros were used to bring supplies along on the hike and were a featured
part of the trips
.
Participants also received the 14,496 Club award patch.
Painted on felt. This patch is documented
as a scout patch from the early 1940's but
direct linkage to Sequoia/Wolverton/High Sierra Camp has not been established. Even
though Crescent Bay Council was not using Sequoia Camp between 1942-45, Sequoia National Park was open and troops were
free to use the park during the summer.
This patch could have been made for such
a troop camp.



             
    1941-Late 1940's
14,496 Club


The week following the end of the 1941 summer camping season, a group of hardy Camp Sierra/Sequoia/Wolverton staff and Senior Scouts set out on a Pack Trip to climb to the top of Mt. Whitney. An award was created to signify membership in the 14,496 Club.
During the 1940's, the 14,496 Club patch was earned primarily by Crescent Bay Senior Scouts and remained a special
Camp Wolverton award.
 

Silk screened on felt.
   
           

 
1946  
 
High Sierra-Sequoia Camp reopened after World War II as CAMP WOLVERTON, presumably named for the historic
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp adjacent to Wolverton Creek and Wolverton Meadow.


    Origins of the Camp Mascots
 
  1946
Good Camper

  1946
Pack Trip
             The patch for 1946 sported a new camp mascot: a bear wearing a beret with a feather. The design for the mascot may have been inspired by a popular MGM studios cartoon character of the 1940's named Barney Bear.
         For over sixty years, the Wolverton mascot was known as the Hamm's Bear for its resemblance to the symbol of Hamm's beer. However, the Hamm's Beer Bear was not introduced until 1952, six years after being first used at Camp Wolverton.
         Camps Emerald Bay and Josepho introduced cartoon camp mascots of their own in 1947. Emerald Bay chose a crazy pirate, possibly inspired by a Yosemite Sam cartoon,
   
   
and Josepho picked an Indian similar to Chief Wahoo of baseball's Cleveland Indians fame.   
         Camp Slauson was the last of the Crescent Bay Council camps to pick a mascot and they chose Disney Studios' Bambi around 1950.


  see varieties of this patch in the
IDENTIFICATION GUIDE


Silk screened on felt. The 1946 patch is
the only dated of the felt bear patches. It
is 3" round, has no backing and there is
no flocking on the silk screened lettering
& design. Only Scouts meeting the "Good Camper" requirements received a patch.
  Silk screened on felt with backing.
There were four 10-day Pack Trips
 planned for summer 1946. Originally
 the trips were all to summit Mt Whitney. However it is thought that the itinerary
for at least one of the trips was
changed to Rae Lakes in what later became Kings Canyon National Park.
 

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1947  

          Camp Wolverton was in full operation in 1947 and expanded to include the "Outpost Camp", a remote camp for older scouts

in The Big Arroyo area of Sequoia National Park. At one time, the canvass patches used for the Outpost Camp were thought to date to 1953 although new evidence indicates this is not the case.

    1947
Good Camper
Felt

  1947
Outpost Camp
Canvass-Yellow
  1947
Outpost Camp
Canvass-Blue

       
    see varieties of this patch in the
IDENTIFICATION GUIDE


Silk screened on felt. Undated.
   3" round, has no backing and there is
no flocking on the silk screened lettering
  or design. Screening is virtually identical to the 1946 patch without the date.


 
    Flocked on canvass. Undated.
Red-only design. 3 1/8" round with backing. Thin yellow stitched border around edge. The canvass patches
were given to scouts that participated in
the Outpost Camps. It may have been thought that canvass was more durable than felt & could be sewn to packs.
Yellow could have been for campers attending their first year at Wolverton.
 
  Flocked on canvass. Undated.
   Red-only design. 3 1/8" round with backing. Thin white stitched border around edge. Blue patches may have
been for Outpost campers returning from 1946. In 1947, Camp Josepho went to 3-colors for patches: yellow for 1st year, blue for 2nd year & white for 3rd year.
Camp Emerald Bay had yellow & white patches in 1947.
 

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 Yellow   Blue   White  Color System for Patches 1947-53

          For seven summers between 1947-53, Crescent Bay Council camp patches came in multiple colors each year. The color system started at Camp Josepho which issued its new Indian mascot patch for 1947 in three different colors. Yellow patches were given to first-time  "Good Campers" at Josepho. Returning summer campers were given a blue patch and for those Good Campers attending their third or more summers at Josepho, a white patch was awarded.
          Camps Wolverton and Emerald Bay adopted a similar system but neither camp had a significant number of Scout campers returning for the third time in 1947. Having been closed for four years between1942-45, there were few, if any, Scout age campers who had attended Wolverton (High Sierra/Sequoia) or Emerald Bay prior to 1946. So for 1947, it is believed that Wolverton and Emerald Bay had only two colors: Yellow and Blue at Wolverton; Yellow & White at Emerald Bay. By the following year, all three camps had three-time returning campers and so there were Yellow, Blue and White patches issued at each camp.
          The sequence for which colors were awarded is somewhat mysterious and may have changed as the years went by. Written documentation for the color system does not exist. What is known today is either circumstantial or hearsay. It appears that all the summer camps used yellow for 1st year. However, Josepho and Wolverton used Blue for 2nd year while Emerald Bay used White for 2nd year. Similarly, Josepho and Wolverton used White for 3rd year and Emerald Bay used Blue for 3rd year.
          To make matters more confusing, there is evidence that by 1952-53, Scoutmasters were given stacks of patches in all three colors to be awarded to the Scouts in their troop as they saw fit, sometimes using the colors to recognize criteria other than the number of times the Scout had been to summer camp.

NOTE:: Wolverton patches issued between 1947-53 are all of the same design, distinguished by small differences created by reordering multiple times. While the following cataloging approximates the dates these patches were used, it is generally thought that individual runs of patches were used until they ran out and there is likely overlapping of usage between years.

Read the 
KEY FEATURES under each year to determine the distinguishing characteristics and refer to the  IDENTIFICATION GUIDE.
for further differences noted between the 1947-53 patches.

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1948  

KEY FEATURES:
3 3/8" diameter • 5/16" or more of felt around design • red is silk screened-black is flocked • no backing


    1948
Yellow Felt
  1948
 Blue 
Felt
  1948
  White
Felt
       
         
   

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1949-50  

KEY FEATURES:
3 ¼" diameter • 3/16" of felt around design • red & black are flocked • no backing (except for one variety of yellow)

see varieties of these patches in the IDENTIFICATION GUIDE

    1949-50
Yellow 
Felt
   1949-50
Blue 
Felt
  1949-50
White 
Felt
   
   
       
   

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1951-52  

KEY FEATURES:
3" diameter • 1/16" of felt around design • red & black are flocked • usually with backing

see varieties of these patches in the IDENTIFICATION GUIDE
 
    1951-52
Yellow
Felt
   1951-52
Blue 
Felt
  1951-52
White
Felt

       
       
   

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1953  

KEY FEATURES:
3" diameter • 1/16" of felt around design • red & black are flocked • SMALL MOUTH WITH NO DIMPLE •  backing


    1953
Yellow 
Felt
  1953
Blue
Felt
  1953
White
Felt

       
             

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1950's Explorer Pack Trips  

          The Camp Wolverton pack trips for senior Scouts started in the early 1940's and continued into the 1950's
. They were usually one or two sessions following the end of the regular Scout camping season. Most of the Pack Trips summitted Mt Whitney, for which the Scouts also received a special 14,496 CLUB patch. In 1950, the name was changed to Explorer Pack Trip. Camp Emerald Bay had its own version of a special session for older Scouts originally called Senior Scout Aquatic Camp, the name was shortened to Aquatic Camp in 1950 and then simply Explorer Camp in 1957. see > Camp Emerald Bay Aquatic Camp patches

    1950   1951-53    Mid 1950's 
       
    Flocked on Canvass. The design elements & construction of the 1950 Explorer Pack Trip patch is similar to the 1950 Emerald Bay Aquatic Camp patch.
 
  Silk screened on felt with backing.
The design elements & construction of
 the 1951-53 Explorer Pack Trip patch are similar to the 1951 Emerald Bay Aquatic Camp patch.
  Embroidered.



 

 
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jump to patches from  >  1940    1941-45    1946    1947    1948    1949-50    1951-52    1953     1954-2011

  
    IDENTIFICATION GUIDE    

          There are more varieties within the Camp Wolverton felt patches issued between 1947-53 than amongst any other Crescent Bay Council camp patches. Each time the patches were reordered, minor differences in the screening created new varieties. When a new screening variety occurred, it typically happened for each of the yellow, blue & white versions of the patch. These variations were not intentional but today are of interest to collectors. In addition, minor varieties within silk screened patches happen as a result of the "two up" process.
How the Silk Screening Process Creates Varieties
           When silk screens are cut, the printer prepares two side-by-side images. This allows the patches to be screened two at a time instead of individually.The process is called TWO UP. Often times, this will create minor differences between the patches screened on the right versus the left.  Sometimes the patches are screened THREE UP or FOUR UP.

The 1946 & 1947 Camp Wolverton patches are good examples of the TWO UP process.
 
1946
TYPE A
 
  1946
TYPE B
 
 
  1947
TYPE A
 
  1947
TYPE B
 

                   

TYPE A
has a DART
shaped dimple
 
TYPE B
has a CRESCENT shaped dimple
 
TYPE A
has a DART
shaped dimple
 
TYPE B
has a CRESCENT shaped dimple

NOTE: There are no known notable varieties of the 1948 or 1953 Camp Wolverton patches

Varieties of 1949-52 Wolverton Patches

It is not known if all colors of Wolverton patches were issued in all of the different variety types. In addition, there may be additional variety types of Camp Wolverton patches that have yet to be noticed. Different colors of each variety are shown below.

TYPE
  IMAGE    DESCRIPTION 
 
YELLOW
 
BLUE
 
WHITE
                     
1949-50
TYPE A

      ONE JAG on bottom right of neck.

DART
shaped dimple.

NO BACKING
 
 
 
image
unavailable


 

       
 
 
 
 
 
 
1949-50
TYPE B
    ONE JAG on bottom right of neck.
 
CRESCENT shaped dimple.

NO BACKING
 

  
 
 
                     
1949-50
TYPE C

 
  ONE JAG on bottom right of neck.
 
CRESCENT shaped dimple.

with BACKING

   

(minor varieties exist)
 
  may not have been
made in blue

  may not have been
made in white
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1949-50
TYPE D

 

 
TWO JAGS on bottom right of neck.
 
NO BACKING
 (Distinguished from 1951-52 TYPE C by being 3¼" diameter)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1949-50
TYPE E

 

 
THREE JAGS on bottom right of neck.
 
SMALL MOUTH

NO BACKING
 (Distinguished from 1951-52 TYPE A by being 3¼" diameter)

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TYPE
 
IMAGE
 
DESCRIPTION
 
YELLOW
 
BLUE
 
WHITE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1951-52
TYPE A

 

 
THREE JAGS on bottom right of neck.

BACKING
(exists without backing)

 (Distinguished from 1949-50 TYPE E by being 3" diameter)
 

 







 

 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1951-52
TYPE B

 

 
TWO JAGS on bottom right of neck.
 
SMALL MOUTH

BACKING

 
 
 





 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1951-52
TYPE C

 

 
TWO JAGS on bottom right of neck.

LARGE MOUTH
 
BACKING
 (Distinguished from 1949-50 TYPE D by being 3" diameter)
 
 
 
image
unavailable

 
 

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jump to patches from  >  1940    1941-45    1946    1947    1948    1949-50    1951-52    1953     1954-72     Wolverton Ski Bowl   
  14,495 Club
   

 
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